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SciFest

Introduction

SciFest’s main object is: To promote Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education through the provision of a forum for students at local/regional/national level to present and display their scientific investigations.

The SciFest programme consists of a series of one-day STEM fairs for second-level students. The aim of the programme is to encourage an interest in, and love of, the STEM subjects. The programme is designed to be as inclusive and accessible as possible. Established in 2006 the programme is now implemented at four distinct levels.

Level 1. Local – SciFest@School>

SciFest@School is where second-level schools host their own in-house SciFest STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths) fair. Support for the event is provided by SciFest in the form of a SciFest STEM Fair Toolkit, resources and BKMs on the SciFest website. Support for judging, certificates and a number of prizes for participating students and promotional materials are also provided. This strand was introduced in 2011 and there has been strong demand from schools to participate. From just 5 schools in 2011 the number of schools engaged with the programme in 2019/2020 increased to 108. This level also includes a SciFest fair in the Trinity Centre for People with Intellectual Disabilities (TCPID) and in the Digital Hub for Teen-Turn students.

Level 2. Regional – SciFest@College>

The Institutes of Technology, TU Dublin, MTU, DCU and St Mary's College, Derry host one-day SciFest STEM fairs which are open to all second-level students. A SciFest fair consists of a competition and exhibition of projects, a prize-giving ceremony, and may also include a selection of science talks, science demonstrations in the college laboratories and advice on careers in STEM and courses available in the college. SciFest@College affords students the opportunity to visit a third-level college, view the facilities and get information on the various STEM courses available. The fact that the event is regionally based and has open and free entry means that SciFest is both accessible and inclusive. The project also has a cross-border aspect as St Mary's College in Derry also hosts a SciFest fair.

Level 3. SciFest National Final

Winning projects from each SciFest@College STEM fair are invited to participate in a national SciFest STEM fair. The projects are evaluated by an expert panel of judges from academia, enterprise and government. Each of the exhibitors is presented with an Excellence in STEM award in recognition of their success at the regional fairs and the overall winners represent Ireland at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) which is held annually in May in the USA. A selection of the winners of the regional Boston Scientific Medical Devices Award also participate in the National Final.

Level 4. SciFest International

SciFest participated in the Intel (now sponsored by Regeneron) International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) for the first time in May 2012. ISEF is a one-week science fair, held annually in the USA since 1950, at which some 1800 students from over 420 affiliated science fairs in approximately 75 countries, regions and territories compete for a range of prizes. The projects are judged by a 1000-strong panel of highly-qualified judges. In the nine years in which SciFest has participated in ISEF our students have won a total of 13 major awards.

The Broadcom MASTERS (Math, Applied Science, Technology and Engineering for Rising Stars) International programme is an experiential award for top delegates from middle science fairs around the world. Participating in the Broadcom MASTERS entitles SciFest to select one junior student to be a Broadcom MASTERS International delegate. This delegate travels with SciFest’s official party attending the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) in the USA. The Broadcom MASTERS International programmeincludes delegates representing approximately 25 countries andconsists of a series of educational activities, including a visit to the ISEF competition.

Winners from the National Final also attend the Long Night of Science in Berlin and represent Ireland in the Hong Kong’s Global Youth Science and Technology Bowl (GYSTB). In the two years in which SciFest has participated in GYSTB our students have won a total of 6 major awards including a top Gold Medal Award.

SciFest@School Information for Teachers" class="Content-Image flexible lazy" src="https://scifest.ie/Images/Content/2021/19/Medium/xxo_20200122_122412.jpg" alt="SciFest@School Information for Teachers" style="border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; border-color: rgb(211, 211, 211); width: 746.65px;" />


Note. Information on this page relates to SciFest@School STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) fairs only, that is, in-house STEM fairs hosted by the schools themselves. For information on SciFest@College fairs, which are regional fairs for second-level students hosted by third level colleges, please follow this //scifest.ie/Page/SciFest@College-Information-for-Teachers/3624/Index.html" style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgb(0, 123, 255); background-color: transparent;">link.

SciFest@School and COVID-19

We are continuing to provide the usual supports as outlined below in the current school year with the exception, for the moment, of visits to the school by external judges; we hope to resume school visits as soon as possible.The attached document details how we are working with schools hosting SciFest@School fairs while recognising the restrictions imposed as a result of COVID-19. Please click SciFest@School 2020_2021.pdf" href="https://scifest.ie/Content/2021/9/pb50-SciFestSchool_2021_2022.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener" style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgb(0, 123, 255); background-color: transparent;">here to download the document. If you have any questions please contact us or email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

What is SciFest@School?>

SciFest@School is where a second-level school hosts their own in-house SciFest STEM fair. When schools closed in March last year 108 SciFest@School STEM fairs were registered for the school year 2019/2020. A list of the fairs may be viewed //scifest.ie/Page/SciFest@School-Fairs-201920/9148/Index.html" style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgb(0, 123, 255); background-color: transparent;">here. Resource materials to support the organisation of a SciFest@School fair are available in the //scifest.ie/Page/Scifest@School-Resources/3685/Index.html" style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgb(0, 123, 255); background-color: transparent;">resources section of this website. In addition to the resource materials support from SciFest is also available in the form of advice on the organisation of a SciFest@School STEM fair, a teacher's pack, certificates for participating students, a number of prizes for winning projects, 'freebies' and support on the day of the event - contact us for details.

When Should I Hold My SciFest@School?>

SciFest@School STEM fairs can be held at any time during the school year. However, you should hold your fair before 11 March if you wish to use your SciFest@School fair to select projects to go forward to SciFest@College 2022. While participating in a SciFest@School fair is good preparation for participating in a SciFest@College fair it is not a requirement; students may enter a SciFest@College fair directly without having participated in a SciFest@School fair.

SciFest@School and the CBAs

Students who have developed a SciFest project should have little difficulty in completing an Extended Experimental Investigation - CBA 1. The skills acquired in preparing a project for a SciFest@School fair are also those assessed in the CBA. Conversely, an Extended Experimental Investigation prepared for a CBA could, with additional work, be subsequently further expanded and developed into a project suitable for exhibiting at a SciFest@School fair.

SciFest@School and TY

Researching, developing and presenting a SciFest project can constitute an ideal module for a Transition Year programme - see Science by Inquiry Transition Year Module here.

SciFest@School and Gaisce - The President's Award

SciFest is a Gaisce Challenge Partner. Students participating in a SciFest STEM fair can use their participation as the Personal Skill element of their Gaisce Award. Those involved in organising SciFest events can use their activities to meet the Community Involvement element of their Gaisce Award. Please click here for further details.

SciFest@School Registration Form

Please SciFest@School Registration Form_2020_2021.xlsx" href="https://scifest.ie/Content/2021/8/zl94-1._SciFestSchool_Registration_Form_2021_2022.xlsx" target="_blank" rel="noopener" style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgb(0, 123, 255); background-color: transparent;">click here to download a copy of the SciFest@School registration form. Tá leagan Gaeilge den foirm seo ar fáil anseo. For details of how we use your data please view our privacy notice.

SciFest@School Guidelines

Please click here to download a copy of the SciFest@School Guidelines. It is important that teachers familiarise themselves with the guidelines when organising a SciFest@School event. Tá leagan Gaeilge den doiciméad seo ar fáil anseo.

SciFest STEM School Award

This is a new award that recognises schools for their support for STEM through hosting five or more SciFest@School STEM fairs. For more information on this award please click here.

SciFest@School Experience

Schools that are hosting SciFest@School fairs in 2021/2022 are //scifest.ie/Page/SciFest@School-Fairs-202122/259684/Index.html" style="font-family: Roboto, sans-serif; font-size: 15px; background-color: transparent; box-sizing: border-box; color: rgb(0, 123, 255);">listed here.

 

If you need further information or have any questions do not hesitate to contact  or email  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Leargas

 

 

leargas

CLIL and Beyond: Pluriliteracies for Deeper Learning


Deadline: 30 September 2021

A two-day training workshop to support teachers in developing their students’ subject specific literacies

About this event

How do I know my student knows? How to equate language level with cognitive level?

If you want to develop your students’ subject specific literacies, this training workshop is for you! Suitable for both language teachers and subject teachers, this training activity is a hands-on practical experience driven by the theory of pluriliteracies.

The workshop is led by experts from the European Centre for Modern Languages. It will take participants from the basics of content and language integrated learning (CLIL) to an understanding of deeper learning episodes that support the transfer of learning across language and subjects, based on the Pluriliteracies model.

The goals of this training workshop are to:

  1. provide you with the content, expertise and time to develop your own deeper learning episode plans;
  2. share materials that you can adapt and use as models in your own practice.

Target groups

  • Teachers;
  • Teacher educators;
  • University educators;
  • Heads of schools.

Results and benefits

  • A deeper understanding of the role of CLIL and the transition to pedagogical and didactic approaches to Pluriliteracies for Deeper Learning.
  • Understanding of deeper learning episodes and their role in progression and transfer.

For queries please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Do you know of a creative, innovative and inspirational language learning initiative, or one that promotes the importance of languages?

The European Language Label Award (ELLA) is coordinated by the European Commission. It highlights and rewards innovative initiatives in language teaching, learning and promotion, and brings these initiatives to the attention of the public along with professionals in the languages field.

The ELLA is open to all fields of education and training. No project is too big or too small, and both accredited and non-accredited initiatives are encouraged to apply. Whether it’s a football team, university, community group, school, youth group, company, or choir – we want to hear your stories of language learning being brought to life!

ELLA applications must support one or more of these six categories:

  1. Engaging language learning environments
  2. Multilingual schools and classrooms
  3. Language-friendly society
  4. Languages for the future
  5. Increasing awareness and changing perceptions
  6. Using technology to enhance language learning techniques

These categories support the award’s aims along with those of Languages Connect. The Digital Strategy for Schools is also supported in category 6.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION LEARGAS.IE WEBSITE

 

TL21 Professional Development Programme

The TL21 Programme is a workshop-based Continuing Professional Development programme for teachers and school leaders that promotes innovative practice and professional learning communities in post-primary schools.
The programme is a research-led one and its two main aims are:

  • to strengthen teachers’ capacities as co-operative and self-critical authors of their own work;
  • to enable students to take an active and responsible part in their own learning.

The programme is currently running as a partnership between the Maynooth University Department of Education, , five Education Centres and Dublin & Dún Laoghaire Education and Training Board. 
Participants in the programme attend a series of CPD workshops in an Education Centre, or ETB venue, over a two-year period and progressively develop their capabilities as innovative practitioners over this period.
Accreditation for participants is available in two forms:

  • an M.Ed in Innovative Learning, based on action research carried out in the participants’ schools;
  • accreditation provided by the Education Centres.

The TL21 Professional Development Programme: Main Features

  • The TL21 Programme is a workshop-based CPD programme that promotes innovative practice and professional learning communities in post-primary schools. It arose from the success of the initiatives pioneered by the TL21 Research & Development project 2003-07 and the TL21 Transfer Initiative 2008-12 (both funded by Atlantic Philanthropies).  It is currently running as a partnership between National University of Ireland Maynooth, five Education Centres and Dublin & Dún Laoghaire Education and Training Board. There are 33 post-primary schools participating at present and there are plans to expand the Programme, especially in the Leinster region. 
  • Participants in the programme attend a series of CPD workshops in an Education Centre, or ETB venue, over a two-year period and progressively develop their capabilities as innovative practitioners over this period.  From the start, the two major aims of the TL21 research have been: (a) to strengthen teachers’ capacities as cooperative and self-critical authors of their own work; (b) to enable students to take an active and responsible part in their own learning.  
  • The active involvement of the school leadership (Principal/DP) is a requirement of a school’s participation. Our research over the last decade has shown that this is crucial in cultivating the school’s strengths in educational leadership and self-evaluation. Schools are not charged for participation.
  • The research dimension of the TL21 model ensures that CPD for teachers is research-informed, as recommended by EU Commission and OECD; but research-informed in a highly practical sense. The programme brings together key insights from international educational research with the action research initiatives of Irish teachers and school leaders to enrich the quality of learning and teaching in participating schools.
  • This model of CPD has shown its strengths in the specific circumstances of Irish post-primary education.  In recognition of this the DES has agreed to provide the necessary measure of funding to secure the programme’s place within the national provision of CPD.
  • The rationale for the TL21 Programme is closely related to the Teaching Council's policy on the Continuum of teacher education, particularly the CPD dimension of that policy. Participants in the university accreditation track of the programme pursue an M.Ed. in Innovative Learning. Those not following the university accreditation track have their participation documented electronically by the Education Centre or ETB. This makes that participation amenable to inclusion in the CPD portfolios recommended for each teacher in the Teaching Council's policy on the continuum.
  • This kind of model of CPD can be extended to other regions of the country, whether or not it’s called “TL21.”  What is important is: (a) that the kind of expertise involved can be shared readily, and learned fairly quickly, by the providing institutions or bodies; (b) that emergent strategies for the crediting of more advanced forms of CPD can be identified and developed.
  • Finally,  The TL21 Programme seeks to embody and extend one of the central aims of the kind of research carried out at the Education Department at the National University of Ireland Maynooth: the enhancement of learning environments in schools through strengthening the capacities of teacher practitioners and school leaderships.
  • To access the TL21 Website, please click here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/TL21 

The mode of delivery of this course will return to a primarily in-person one in September 2021, subject to government health guidelines. We are exploring the option to take some modules in a blended/online modality (a mixture of in-person and online), this will be confirmed at a later stage and will be based on student interest and demand

Is this course for me?

The course modules aim to enhance the expertise of participant teachers in new models of teaching and learning with particular emphasis on Science Technology Engineering Maths/Computer Science. They also aim to address complex challenges related to developing an inclusive educational environment and preparing all school students for higher academic aspiration and progression, through a focus on whole school culture, leadership and change. It is intended that participant teachers will learn how to develop and lead a 'cultural change process' within the classroom and the wider school community.

Coordinator for TL21 - 2021/2023

Tony Collison

List of Schools Taking Part in 2021/2023

Colaiste Bride, Enniscorthy

Presentation Wexford

Presentation Carlow

St. Peter's College, Wexford

Tullow Community School

St. Mary's College, Arklow

FCJ Bunclody, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford

Enniscorthy Community College

 

Q. Who is this course for?

A: The course is aimed at currently practicing teachers in post-primary schools in Ireland. It is suitable for teachers of any subject, not just STEM. Every year, we also have several primary school teachers take part; however, the course is only suitable for teachers of senior primary students, i.e. 5th and 6th class. We also accept teachers in Further Education, Third Level institutes, and informal educators such as CoderDojo staff. An interview may be required if an applicant falls outside our typical target audience. Due to the practical nature of most of the modules and assignments, applicants should be class teachers or at least have sufficient access to groups of students for the purposes of lesson planning and implementation.

Q: Will the PG Cert qualify me to be a teacher?

A: No. The Certificate requires that students are already qualified teachers/other practicing educators. While the Cert allows students to explore issues in education and aims to enhance participants' knowledge and practice in educational spheres, it is not designed so as to qualify graduates to teach.

Q: What is the deadline for applications?

A: The deadline is 31st May 2021. All supporting documents must be received by 30th June 2021. (See next section for a list of these).

Q: What do I need to include in my application?

A: An application form (submitted online), two references and an up-to-date CV are required for all applications. An academic transcript from your degree, and a degree certificate (parchment) are also required. If you won't be able to submit the transcript or certificate until after 30th June, please upload placeholder documents in order to submit the application. Students who studied for their primary degree through a medium other than English are asked to provide certification of their linguistic competence in English (e.g. grade 6.5 IELTS).

Q: When will I be informed of the decision on my application?

A: Applications are assessed and offers are made on a rolling basis. For non-EU students, we aim to communicate a decision on applications within three weeks of receiving the completed application.

Q: Who should I choose as my referees?

A: Ideally you would give the names of one academic referee (e.g. a lecturer who taught you) and one professional referee (preferably the principal of your current school). If you have been out of formal education for some time, and would not have an appropriate academic referee, your second reference can be from another professional colleague (such as your deputy principal or a former principal).

Course Schedule 2021/23

The final schedule for the 2021/22 year will be confirmed and posted closer to the course start date in September 2021, based on demand for the various modules.

A new two-year cycle of Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century (TL21) will begin in Co. Wexford Education Centre in September 2021 and will continue to April 2023.

During the TL21 Programme, a core group of 4/5 teachers that includes a Deputy Principal leads the initiative in each school.
They choose an action research project directly linked to teaching and learning/curriculum.  Through ten workshops over a period of two years, they complete the project and present their results at a seminar held in the Education Centre.  

 https://youtu.be/GgOIQGeLQyE

Gallery 2019 

Computing At Schools

Computing At Schools (CAS) is here to aid the Primary Sector, Post-Primary Schools and Educational Centres in Ireland. We provide training and resources across a wide spectrum including such areas as Computer Science (CS), Information Communication Technology (ICT) and Cyber Safety. We live in an ever-increasing digital world, together let’s ensure our students not only survive but excel!

Post-Primary Sector In-house

Junior Cycle Short Coding Teacher CPD (3 Strands)

Transition Year Course – Bespoke TY course tailored to each schools requirements

Cyber Safety Programmes – Student, Parents & Teachers

ICT for Post-Primary (ECDL Schools Kit)

In-house Classroom Programmes

In-house Coding Clubs

Primary Sector In-house

Primary Teacher Coding CPD (3 Strands)

In-Class Computer Science Delivery

Cyber Safety Programmes – Student, Parents & Teachers

In-house Classroom Programmes

In-house Coding Clubs

Creative Clusters Project

This year our project was called ‘DREAMM – Drop Everything and Make Music’

The project involved:

  • Four hours professional development led my Mary Amond for all teachers and SNAs from the five participating schools
  • Daily, informal, incidental in-class singing by all pupils in each school
  • Teachers developed a repertoire of suitable material throughout the project
  • It is planned that the pupils all five schools will come together in June 2020 for a celebration of singing when they will all sing together
  • Pupils attitudes towards singing were surveyed in October 2019 and a similar survey in June 2020 wi8ll track any changes
  • The overall aim was the promotion of singing as an enjoyable and beneficial activity for ALL

There were 5 schools involved in the project. List of schools involved:

  • Mayglass NS (Lead School)
  • Scoil Mhuire, Our Lady’s Island, Broadway 
  • St Margaret’s NS, Curracloe
  • St Mary’s NS, Tagoat
  • Piercestown NS
  • Eamonn Barrett (Facilitator)

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The purpose and aims of Creative Clusters

The purpose of this pilot scheme is to demonstrate how the creative practices can support clusters of schools to work together to address common learning challenges over a two year period.

It aims to:

 Promote new ways of working and collaboration between schools and the arts and cultural sector

 Improve teaching and learning

 Provide an opportunity for clusters of schools to experiment, innovate and collaborate on the design, implementation and evaluation of a bespoke creative learning project

 Develop the creativity of learners and teachers

 Understand, whether clustering schools at different stages of their journey in using the creativity in the classroom and in developing longer term partnerships is an effective model for developing and embedding practice in schools.

The Creative Clusters scheme provides schools with access to creative people, skills and resources and supports them to draw on their own skills and experiences and those within their wider communities.

Background

Creative Clusters is a pilot initiative of the Department of Education and Skills, led by and in partnership with the 21 full-time Teacher Education Centres (Education Support Centres Ireland - ESCI) and funded through the Schools Excellence Fund – Creative Clusters Initiative.

Creative Clusters is an important initiative of Creative Youth – A Plan to Enable the Creative Potential of Every Child and Young Person, which was published in December 2017 as part of the Creative Ireland Programme. The Creative Youth Plan aims to give every child practical access to tuition, experience and participation in art, music, drama and coding by 2022.

What is a Creative Cluster and how many schools are involved?

A Creative Cluster will typically consist of between three and five schools collaborating on the design, implementation, evaluation and dissemination of an innovative creative learning project which supports them to address a common issue or challenge. Creative Clusters will include schools at different stages of their journey in using creativity in the classroom.

Clusters can consist of primary schools only, post-primary schools only or a combination of primary and post primary schools. In selecting the clusters to participate in the scheme, the initiative will seek to have all three configurations represented.

Clusters can be drawn from existing networks or result from the creation of new ones. Each cluster must nominate a lead school. The lead school must identify a Creative Cluster Coordinator who would normally be a member of the school’s senior leadership team.

Substitution costs to the equivalent of 1 day per term for the duration of the pilot project will be provided for the Creative Cluster Coordinator. If the application is successful the co-ordinator will be responsible for managing the day-to-day operation of the project and will act as a single point of contact during the duration of the project. The other schools in each cluster must nominate a representative to participate in the project.

How many Creative Clusters will there be in 2020?

It is envisaged a further 21 clusters will be established in 2020.

How long will the Creative Clusters scheme run for?

Clusters established in 2020 will operate for two years.

What is the application process?

Creative Clusters is a national programme of local projects and the 21 full-time Education Centres across Ireland are lead partners in the initiative. They will have a key role in identifying and supporting a Creative Cluster for their local area.

Individual schools, existing networks of schools and potential clusters of schools must apply to their local full-time Education Centre outlining their rationale for taking part in Creative Clusters initiative by 5pm on Friday, 15 May 2020. 

Following the application process the local Education Centre will assess and score applications against the criteria below:

 The rationale for the application The includes the extent to which the school or schools involved have identified a clear rationale for applying to be a Creative Cluster, how this fits with the aims of the initiative and their initial ideas of common issues or learning challenges they could address

 Benefits to teaching and learning This includes how participation will support improvements in teaching and learning, in the development of creativity and in areas of the curriculum

 Capacity and commitment of all the schools in the cluster to participate This includes the extent to which the senior leaders in the school or schools are committed to the cluster and to mobilising their school community to engage and how schools in the cluster, who are at different stages of their journey in using the arts and creativity in the classroom, see themselves supporting each other

 Children and Young People’s Voice This includes the extent to which the application demonstrates a clear plan for ensuring children and young people play a central role in developing, implementing and evaluating their Creative Cluster project.

The local Education Centre will then inform the identified cluster in their area. Unsuccessful applicants will also be notified.

Which schools are not eligible to apply to lead or participate in a Creative Cluster?

The following schools may not apply to lead or participate in a Creative Cluster:

 Schools not in receipt of capitation grants from the Department of Education and Skills/Education and Training Boards and are not in the freeeducation scheme;

 Schools that are already leading or participating in a Creative Cluster in the 2020/21 school year;

 Schools that are selected to begin participating in the Creative Schools initiative1 from September 2020;

 Schools who are electing to continue into the second year of Creative Schools (i.e. those who started in September 2019);

 Schools selected to participate in other Schools Excellence Fund initiatives (DEIS, Digital or STEM). The following schools may apply to lead or participate in a Creative Cluster:

 Schools that have never participated in Creative Schools or Creative Clusters, or are not participating in any other Schools Excellence Fund Initiatives.

 Schools who will have completed their second year of Creative Schools by end of the 2019/20 school year;

 Schools who are completing their second year in the Creative Clusters initiative in the 2019/20 school year, provided that they are applying as part of a cluster of schools who have not yet participated in the initiative. In this instance, it is encouraged that this school applies to lead the new cluster. 1The Creative Schools initiative is an initiative led by the Arts Council that supports individual schools to develop and begin to implement their own Creative Schools plan.

What support is provided to the Creative Clusters?

Selected clusters can expect support to include the following:

 An initial one day training event for Creative Cluster Coordinators and at least one representative from each of the schools in the cluster. This will provide an opportunity for schools in the individual Creative Clusters to work together to develop and progress the focus for their cluster work

 A specially trained Creative Cluster Facilitator who will support the cluster for up to three local creative cluster meetings over the 2020-21 school year. The Creative Cluster Facilitator will work with the Cluster to develop, implement and evaluate an arts and creative learning project which helps participating schools to address a common school issue or development need. The Cluster will have flexibility in how they wish to schedule these meeting times and days, in consultation with their local Education Centre. Further support from facilitators may be provided in the 2021-2022 school year.

 Paid substitution will be provided for the Regional Cluster Training event and two/three local cluster meetings per school year.

 Networking opportunities with other schools including other Creative Clusters and schools participating in other Creative Youth initiatives to share learning.

What funding is available to each Creative Cluster?

Funding has been set aside for the following:

 Each Creative Cluster will receive funding of €3,000 per school in each cluster over a two year period to implement their project in the 2020–2022 school years (e.g. a cluster of 3 schools would get €9,000 over two years while a cluster of 5 schools would receive €15,000 over two years).

Schools in a cluster are expected to collaborate on how this funding is allocated and spent to support the implement of their project.

Clusters will receive 50% of the total funding in Year 1, with the second 50% being provided in Year 2.

Do clusters have to have a project idea?

This is not a requirement. Those clusters that are selected to take part will begin their journey as a Creative Cluster by participating in a Regional Cluster Training day. On this day the schools in each cluster will spend time working together to identify a focus for their project work as a Creative Cluster. Assessment and Selection Creative Cluster applications will be assessed by the Local Education Centre.

Applications will be assessed and scored against the criteria below.

1. The rationale for the application This includes the extent to which the school(s) involved have identified a clear rationale for applying to be a Creative Cluster and their initial ideas of common issues or learning challenges they could address

2. Benefits to teaching and learning This includes how participation will support improvements in teaching and learning, in the development of the arts and creativity and in areas of the curriculum

3. Capacity and commitment of all the schools in the cluster to participate This includes the extent to which the senior leaders in each of the schools are committed to the cluster and to mobilising their school community to engage and how schools in the cluster, who are at different stages of their journey in using the arts and creativity in the classroom, see themselves supporting each other

4. Children and Young Peoples Voice This includes the extent to which the application demonstrates a clear plan for ensuring children and young people play a central role in developing, implementing and evaluating their Creative Cluster project.

Creative Clusters Timeline Closing date for applications 15 May 2020 Announcement of Creative Clusters May 2020 Regional Training for Creative Cluster Late September 2020

Detailed project planning and implementation work begins October 2020

Initiative completion and review May 2022 

Owing to the current Covid-19 crisis, the deadline for Creative Clusters applications has now been extended to the 26th of June 2020 . Applications should be submitted to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.Click here to Apply

 

Please see examples of the wonderful work been done in our local schools on the Arts in Education Portal to access website click here  http://artsineducation.ie/en/organisations/wexford-education-centre/

creative clusters

 

County Wexford Education Centre

Location. Suíomh

Milehouse Road, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford

EIRCODE: Y21 T271

Transportation

Local Buses and ample carparking available

Contact us. Dean Teagmháil

Tel: (053) 92 39100
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

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